Thursday, July 29, 2004

Enerjy Software Releases Edition 5b of Java Development Tools

Enerjy Software Releases Edition 5b of Java Development Tools

Enerjy Software, a global leader in developing agile software tools for Java application developers, today announced the release of Edition 5b of its Java suite of tools. With the release of Edition 5b, all four of the tools in Enerjy's line-up, which includes Enerjy Code Analyzer, Enerjy Memory Profiler, Enerjy Performance Profiler and Enerjy Thread Profiler, will now support Eclipse 3.0 and Japanese language developers. In addition, Edition 5b will offer support for Oracle JDeveloper 10g in Enerjy Code Analyzer.


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Eclipse IDE 3.0 Users Get Powerful Data Persistence With CocoBase(R) Enterprise O/R From THOUGHT Inc.(R)

Eclipse IDE 3.0 Users Get Powerful Data Persistence With CocoBase(R) Enterprise O/R From THOUGHT Inc.(R)

THOUGHT Inc.®, The Dynamic O/R Mapping(TM) Company, announces the integration of CocoBase® Enterprise O/R, the market leader and award winning Dynamic Object to Relational Mapping(TM) tool, with the open source Eclipse Development Environment Version 3.0. This provides Eclipse developers easy access to CocoBase's® powerful enterprise-level data persistence functionality from within the tool environment. Integrating CocoBase's® extensive feature-set for Object to Relational Mapping provides developers with the ability to quickly persist data using EJB CMP / BMP, Session Beans, Dynamic Transparent Persistence, and stand-alone persistence all in one easy to use toolset. Combine the CocoBase® ease of use with its ability to decrease up to 85% of the database access development costs and you have a compelling value-add for companies using Eclipse.

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Wednesday, July 28, 2004

New Visual Development Tool Delivers Cross-Platform Web Applications That Approach the Versatility of Rich Clients

New Visual Development Tool Delivers Cross-Platform Web Applications That Approach the Versatility of Rich Clients
EchoStudio ships with the next generation of the open-source Echo Framework, version 1.1, an engine which enables Web applications to more closely approximate the characteristics of rich clients. Echo abstracts web development from the page-based, request-response nature of HTTP, allowing developers to focus on the interactions of an application using the component-oriented and event-driven paradigm preferred in user interface development.

By building EchoStudio atop the renowned Eclipse 3.0 platform, EchoStudio comes out of the gate with world-class source editing, refactoring, unit testing, collaboration and debugging tools. Adding to that advantage, Eclipse-based products offer superior platform look-and-feel integration compared to traditional Java-based development environments. For seasoned Eclipse developers, EchoStudio is also packaged as a plug-in only version that can be added to existing Eclipse 3.0 installations.

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Monday, July 26, 2004

Aonix Delivers Eclipse-based Ada IDE for Mission- and Safety-Critical Development

Aonix Delivers Eclipse-based Ada IDE for Mission- and Safety-Critical Development
onixADT opens Ada developers to a gamut of third-party tools

Aonix(R), an independent global company delivering complete solutions for safety- and mission-critical applications, is pleased to announce the Beta release of AonixADT--an Eclipse-based Integrated Development Environment (IDE) for the Ada language. Because Eclipse offers a common platform for which many companies have developed plug-ins, Aonix has extended the wealth of interoperable technologies and tool flexibility available to Ada developers by ensuring that AonixADT (Ada Development Toolkit) builds on such a universal platform.

In the mission- and safety-critical market, developers come from a number of industry sectors, each carrying its own certification standards and specialized tools. By delivering the power of the standard Eclipse IDE with Ada programming language awareness, Aonix provides developers with built-in support for the project manager, editor, difference capability, compile, debug, and command history. Developers can focus on building applications, not on integrating tools since AonixADT also retains a large set of existing plug-ins for third-party tools, including support for source-code configuration management.

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IBM pledges better tools integration

IBM pledges better tools integration
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida uses IBM's Rational Rose tool for building visual models and RequisitePro for managing application requirements. But the company must manually build links when it wants to share information between the two.

That's due to change by the end of the year, when IBM pledges to provide deeper integration between all of its tools through the 3.0 version of the open-source Eclipse framework that it turned over to an independent management body. With the new edition, users won't have to launch each tool separately. They will be able to park themselves in a single user interface while they work with IBM Rational's tools, and they can customize the setup to see only what they need.

Not only does the workspace promise to be a lot easier on the eyes, but users will be able to drag information from one tool and drop it into another without having to write scripts and export and import files, according to IBM.

"Right now, they're not as tightly integrated, so you have to jump between tools," said Brian Harrington, an IT project manager at Blue Cross and Blue Shield in Jacksonville, Fla.

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Java, .Net Tools Shaping Up As Battleground

Java, .Net Tools Shaping Up As Battleground
IBM and other sellers of Java development tools are known for the sophisticated functionality they put in their tools to help support large teams of programmers. Microsoft's tools are known for their ease of use. Now, each camp is trying to grab a piece of the other's territory.

Microsoft's Visual Studio 2005 Team System will integrate the work of the various members of software-development teams into one toolset, letting architects who write requirements for software projects work in the same environments as developers writing the code, for example. That will increase the productivity of teams, Microsoft says. But IT shops will have to wait for those features to show up. Last week, Microsoft CFO John Connors said he expects company revenue from development tools to decline during the current fiscal year, which began July 1, as users wait for the new version of Visual Studio, not scheduled to arrive until the middle of next year.

At the same time, IBM's Rational unit is trying to draw closer to Microsoft in ease of use. At an IBM conference last week for developers who use Rational tools, the company said it plans to deliver by year's end versions of the tools that add visual navigation features, wizard assistants, and greater ease of use. The goal of the tools, code-named Atlantic, is to make it easier for existing Java programmers to produce code and expand the ranks of Java programmers. "There'll be a lot less toggling back and forth between tools than in older versions," says Michael Devlin, general manager of the Rational unit. In addition, Atlantic will be more fully integrated with IBM's Eclipse open-source development platform.

Java tool makers, such as IBM's Rational software unit and Sun Microsystems with its Java Studio Creator, want to take their enterprise-development tools and move them to less-skilled developers, while Microsoft wants a larger share of developers who build large-business apps and of programmers who work on complex projects in distributed teams. "Our goal is to create a mass market in enterprise tools," says Rick LaPlante, general manager of Visual Studio 2005 Team System at Microsoft.

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IBM Takes On Microsoft Over Modeling Tools

IBM Takes On Microsoft Over Modeling Tools
With the Texas panhandle as the backdrop, IBM called Microsoft Corp. out for an old-fashioned shootout last week when it unveiled its "Atlantic" tool suite.

With Atlantic, the code name for the next version of IBM Software Development Platform, IBM plans deeper integration among its components for designing, modeling, developing, testing, deploying and maintaining applications. Atlantic promises greater integration with the Java-based Eclipse open-source development platform and tight support for UML (Unified Modeling Language) 2.0.

One key issue separating IBM Rational's tools from Microsoft's VSTS (Visual Studio Team System) solution is the approach to modeling. UML is the OMG (Object Management Group) standard for modeling. IBM said it is necessary; Microsoft said it is not.

Rick LaPlante, general manager for VSTS at Microsoft, said UML represents an unnecessarily complex model for many developers and is not a strategy Microsoft will explicitly support. "Ten years from now, modeling won't be reserved for the priests in the organization," LaPlante said. "Nor will it be this thing done on the side that requires a special organization that is the only people who do modeling. I think it will become pervasive."

Atlantic is due by year's end, IBM officials said. Microsoft's VSTS will ship by the middle of next year, with the "Whidbey" version of Visual Studio and the "Yukon" database.

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Friday, July 23, 2004

Computer science students get boost from IBM

Computer science students get boost from IBM
Buell Duncan, IBM's general manager of developer relations, said that the partnership was forged to provide "in-demand skills for an on-demand world." Buell said there is a gap today between the conventional computer science courses offered by colleges and what businesses actually require from their employees.

Through the initiative, IBM will work with colleges and universities that support open standards to promote open source initiatives such as the Linux and Eclipse tools platforms.

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Thursday, July 22, 2004

IBM Backs Open IT Education

IBM Backs Open IT Education
IBM has announced an initiative to collaborate with IT training institutions around the world in teaching open standard skills necessary to meet changes in the IT workplace.

The IBM Academic Initiative is aimed at spreading the adoption of open standards around the world by helping institutions teach high-value job skills on open technologies such as Java, Linux and Eclipse.

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IBM to bring 'Atlantic' to open-source shore

IBM to bring 'Atlantic' to open-source shore
By the end of the year, IBM said Monday, it will release an update of its Rational development tool suite that will simplify creation of business applications among teams of developers. The next version, code-named Atlantic, will support the Java Server Faces specification to ease front-end Web development. IBM's modeling tools will work with the unified modeling language (UML) 2.0, the latest standard for designing applications.

The Atlantic edition of the Rational "application lifecycle" tools--used for testing, coding, modeling and other application development tasks--will be based on the Eclipse open-source software. Eclipse improves integration of tools and allows programmers to use different tools from a single programming application. IBM also said WebSphere Studio Device Developer version 5.7 will be available by the end of the month. The tool is for building Java applications that run on mobile devices, such as phones.

Tuesday, July 20, 2004

IBM to bring Eclipse tools to desktop applications

IBM to bring Eclipse tools to desktop applications
IBM on Monday detailed a line of programming tools meant to create a market of customized add-ons for its Lotus Workplace desktop applications.

The company said its Rational development tools division is working on programming tools for building applications to run in conjunction with Lotus Workplace, IBM's alternative to Microsoft's Office desktop software. Slated for release later this month, Workplace is a set of simplified productivity applications, such as word processing and e-mail, that can run on multiple operating systems, including Linux. Microsoft's Office only runs on Windows and Mac OS.

With the new development tools, IBM wants to enlist independent software vendors and corporate developers to write add-ons to its Lotus Workplace software, IBM executives said Monday. A health care software provider could, for example, customize the Lotus Workplace applications for doctors that use a handheld computer. IBM detailed the Workplace tools at the Rational user conference, which is being held in Grapevine, Texas, this week.

The tools will be built using the Eclipse open-source programming application. Basing the products on Eclipse means that developers can install add-ons, or "plug-ins," designed for building Workplace applications.

IBM's Rational division has made a significant investment in the Eclipse open-source software. The company's long-term direction is to rewrite its existing line of application life cycle tools to work as plug-ins to Eclipse.


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Friday, July 16, 2004

WILOG Readies Free Version of Its Rules Engine. Claims new Eclipse plug-in allows logic to be updated without code tinkering

Claims new Eclipse plug-in allows logic to be updated without code tinkering
Online retailers constantly change the rules that govern their e-commerce applications. But offering short-term promotions, such as giving platinum-level customers a 10 percent discount at checkout, causes headaches for developers, who have to go in and alter the application’s source code accordingly.

To ease that process, ILOG Inc. made available last month a free, scaled-down version of its business rules technology. An Eclipse plug-in, Business Rule Studio Developer Edition is based on the company’s JRules software, launched in 1997, said ILOG’s director of industry marketing, Henry Bowers.

Changes such as discount offers appear trivial, but the tasks associated with them are time-consuming to complete, said Bowers. The developer has to crack open the code, change one or more files, repackage them for deployment, and test the updated application. “Did I break anything? Is the change I made effective?” said Bowers. And the next day, the discount might jump from 10 percent to 15 percent, he said.

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Will Sun get behind Eclipse?

Will Sun get behind Eclipse?
Analysts are calling on Sun Microsystems to make its NetBeans open-source integrated development environ- ment (IDE) work with the Eclipse open-source IDE, in order to head off the challenge from Microsoft's dot-Net.

Eclipse started life as an IBM initiative but last year IBM handed over control to the independent Eclipse Foundation. Sun contributed NetBeans to the open source community in June 2000, and IBM made Eclipse open source a year later.

Sun said that there have been two million downloads of the NetBeans IDE. But Eclipse - which supports development in other languages in addition to Java - has gained even greater traction among Java developers.

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Thursday, July 15, 2004

New Eclipse Project to Develop Open-Source Testing Platform

New Eclipse Project to Develop Open-Source Testing Platform
The Eclipse Foundation next month plans to announce a new open-source project to deliver an open platform for frameworks and services for test and performance tools used along the software development lifecycle.

According to foundation officials, the Eclipse Foundation will announce its Test and Performance Tools Platform Top Level Project at the LinuxWorld Conference & Expo in San Francisco early next month. Intel Corp., an Eclipse member, will lead the project. The project will foster open-source collaboration in testing and other areas.

Essentially, the test and performance tools platform will provide an infrastructure upon which test and performance tools can be built. These tools include testing tools and tracing and profiling tools, as well as tools for logging, monitoring, tuning, analysis, autonomics and administration. In addition, the platform will include data collection services and user interfaces for tracing, executing test cases, and tracking logging and statistical behavior in local or remote execution environments, according to foundation officials.

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Tuesday, July 13, 2004

BEFORE YOU COULD SAY BOLOGNA SANDWICH, IBM ADOPTED THE ECLIPSE RCP

http://www.eclipsenews.com
Staunch Eclipse supporter IBM didn't waste any time in adopting the
Rich Client Platform features in the new Eclipse 3.0. Big Blue's Lotus
Software brand is expected to release this month a new Workplace
Client Technology and supporting collaborative applications on top of
the Eclipse Rich Client Platform.

"Eclipse is an extensible integration platform," said Rick Wilson,
Lotus's architect of the Workplace Client Technology. "It's a powerful
model."

IBM's new Workplace Client Technology comprises three server-managed
client options that administrators can assign to workers, depending on
their computing needs. A Web browser provides a light client for
accessing applications, a rich client provides a traditional portal
environment for accessing applications, and a microenvironment
provides a wireless client for accessing business applications through
mobile devices.

Applications that Lotus built for its Workplace platform and also
based on Eclipse, including Lotus Workplace Messaging 2.0 and Lotus
Workplace Document Management 2.0, can be accessed through the Lotus
client model. Those applications also should be available this month.

The model is built using the new Eclipse 3.0 runtime environment
features for developing rich client platforms. "Eclipse provided the
underpinnings," Wilson said, for the construction of desktop
applications.

The Eclipse Foundation made changes to the 3.0 release that make it
possible for developers to build applications on top of Eclipse. "We
refactored the basic framework within the Eclipse platform," said Mike
Milinkovich, executive director of the Eclipse Foundation. New rich
client platform capability includes Eclipse's window-based workbench
GUI, the dynamic plug-in functional extension mechanism, help
subsystem, and update manager.

The Rich Client Platform is a new area for Eclipse, but community
interest and user feedback provided the motivation for building the
capability into the Eclipse integrated development environment.

Lotus employed Eclipse components like the Standard Widget Toolkit
(SWT), JFace, and the workbench to compose user interfaces and create
things like rich client platform views and editors in its Workplace
Client Technology.

Lotus developers also leveraged the thin client frameworks that
traditionally serve browser content in its rich client technology.
"The idea is that Lotus Workplace rich client technology can drive the
views that show up on the client page through the same model that
drives the content for browsers and use a portlet to define the page,"
Wilson said. "Portlets can be combined with portal access control and
user policy to retrieve components needed by the client to realize
that page." The platform brings middleware in J2EE to the client side.

This server management component of the Workplace clients and
applications also is based on the Eclipse rich client platform, and is
a big key of how Lotus products add value to the Eclipse platform as a
plug-in. Where the Eclipse Rich Client Platform is unmanaged, Lotus
added features for a managed environment. The result is a rich client
that doesn't have to roundtrip for data.

"The [Lotus] rich client platform is a browser on steroids," Wilson
continued. "We have a truly unique approach doing this."

Lotus also contributed to the Eclipse Foundation's efforts by helping
deliver the rich client capability within Eclipse. They helped change
the runtime of Eclipse components to make the framework more rich
client friendly, Wilson said.
-- Rita-Lyn Sanders, Eclipse News Senior News Editor

Monday, July 12, 2004

MontaVista Linux to Support Freescale i.MX21 Applications Processor

MontaVista Linux to Support Freescale i.MX21 Applications Processor
MontaVista DevRocket(tm) is a fully integrated and graphical development environment, available with both Pro and CEE. It is designed to facilitate system software and applications development. MontaVista DevRocket, based on Eclipse technology, provides a common look-and-feel across development host platforms including Windows(r), Solaris(r) and Linux. MontaVista DevRocket is built on the latest Eclipse base, letting customers and ISVs take full advantage of the Eclipse platform, including third-party development work contributed by the Eclipse community, as well as a multitude of Eclipse-supported tools.

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Friday, July 09, 2004

Eclipse packaged with plug-ins for ease of use

Eclipse packaged with plug-ins for ease of use
Eclipse-based tools provider Innoopract is shipping Yoxos, a $19.95 Eclipse 3.0 distribution that is equipped with popular plug-ins to ease the load on open source developers.

The company is positioning Yoxos as a solution for developers who want to leverage open source offerings but cannot spend weeks evaluating dozens of plug-ins to keep their environment up to date. Yoxos spares developers from having to find, download, and install plug-ins and manage versions of plug-ins, according to Innoopract. The goal of the product is to provide distribution services to manage and install custom development environments from a broad set of open source offerings, according to Innoopract.

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Thursday, July 08, 2004

IBM Opens Gates to Hyades for Rational

IBM Opens Gates to Hyades for Rational
IBM Corp is standardizing software quality tools from Rational Software on an Eclipse open source framework, improving interoperability with third parties' products.

Rational's Automated Software Quality (ASQ) tools will either be based on the Eclipse Hyades project or adapted to interoperate with Hyades, IBM said yesterday.

Products under the software quality banner include IBM Rational Functional Tester for Java and Web, Robot, Performance Tester, Team Unifying Platform, PurifyPlus, Rose XDE Developer Plus and Test RealTime. IBM said it expects Hyades to feature in the next major release of the Rational tools set later this year.

IBM is a founding member of both Eclipse and Hyades. However this incremental move by Rational onto Hyades comes as IBM yesterday also announced the Continuously Ensured Quality initiative (CEQ), which it said is focused on all the roles, processes, artifacts and tools in application lifecycle management (ALM).

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Wednesday, July 07, 2004

Java Developers Aren't Buying Sun's Tools Pitch

Java Developers Aren't Buying Sun's Tools Pitch
Daniel Vela, a San Antonio-based software engineer at Sierra Nevada Corp., said he has no need for Sun's commercial tools because NetBeans is more than adequate. He said several colleagues also use NetBeans, and two of them have opted for the open-source Eclipse IDE that IBM created and this year turned over to an independent nonprofit corporation to manage.

An architect at a big investment bank who asked not to be named said he uses Eclipse, NetBeans and IntelliJ. He said he abandoned Borland's JBuilder because of the expense and opted for the cheaper IntelliJ. He said he tends to favor Eclipse over NetBeans because it's 'snappier.'

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IBM Rational Goes Hyades With Testing Tools Offerings

IBM Rational Goes Hyades With Testing Tools Offerings
IBM Rational says it will standardize its suite of automated software quality (ASQ) tools on the Hyades open-source platform. Rational says, “By making its software quality tools Hyades-compliant, Rational will provide third-party testing tool vendors and IT organizations with a standardized platform on which to build products, reducing the need to re-create baseline capabilities such as HTTP load testing and runtime analysis.”

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Yoxos to Help Unlock Eclipse's Potential

Yoxos to Help Unlock Eclipse's Potential
Innoopract, a German provider of tools and services around the Eclipse open-source development framework, has announced Yoxos, an open-source Eclipse distribution featuring Eclipse 3.0.

The Karlsruhe, Germany, company, dubbed Innoopract Informationssysteme GmbH, introduced Yoxos last week as a distribution of the new Eclipse 3.0 technology and many of the popular Eclipse plug-ins for doing Web development, said Jochen Krause, founder and president of the company.

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Tuesday, July 06, 2004

Beehive pollinates Eclipse

Beehive pollinates Eclipse
Java's success is based on the write-once, run-anywhere promise. But as the number of development environments increased the view for developers was not as rosy. The development user interface varied by vendor, as did the application development frameworks, which were used to develop Java more rapidly and consistently. This meant that developers could not move easily from one environment to another, as they needed to learn a new user interface and worse a new set of frameworks and controls. Even worse, the frameworks might not run on all platforms.

The obvious competitor to Java is Microsoft .NET. which provides a single development experience and runs on a multitude of Microsoft platforms. Thus it is attractive to the developer even if it is not as flexible in its deployment.

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Sunday, July 04, 2004

Easing Java Construction

Easing Java Construction
Java development will become markedly easier if upcoming technologies from Eclipse Foundation and Sun Microsystems live up to their promise.

Version 3.0 of the open source Eclipse platform, announced this week, focuses on improving the Java IDE (integrated development environment) and on serving as a Rich Client Platform for tools integration and client application development.
Sun Java Studio Creator, the company's purported easy-to-use Java tool for building workgroup and departmental applications, is due this summer. The tool was a major theme of the JavaOne Conference this week.

To boost the IDE, Eclipse has simplified installation, improved customization of menus and toolbars, and added a role- and experience-based approach for managing workbench features.

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Friday, July 02, 2004

Nokia Backs Eclipse for Building Apps

Nokia Backs Eclipse for Building Apps
SAN FRANCISCO—Nokia extended its support for Java development by announcing support of the Eclipse platform for developers building applications to run on its phones and devices.

The Helsinki, Finland-based mobile communications giant announced support for the open-source development platform Tuesday at the JavaOne Conference here. And Pertti Korhonen, chief technology officer at Nokia Corp., delivered a keynote presentation at the conference highlighting the company's commitment to Java.

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JAVAONE: Sun participation in Eclipse still possible

JAVAONE: Sun participation in Eclipse still possible
July 1, 2004�The on-again, off-again issue of Sun Microsystems participating in the Eclipse open source tools initiative may soon be on again.

Sun's Jeff Jackson, vice president of Java developer tools at the company, said during the 2004 JavaOne conference on Wednesday that he will be meeting next week with the new executive director of Eclipse, Mike Milkinkovich, to discuss issues related to Eclipse and Sun's own open source tools platform, NetBeans.

Asked if the Sun-joining-Eclipse issue was dead, Jackson said, 'No, I don't think it's dead. I think we're open to all kinds of discussions.' Sun still might join Eclipse and merge NetBeans with Eclipse, he said.

'There's always room for discussion,' Jackson said during a session entitled, 'Roundtable: Great Java Minds.'

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