Monday, February 28, 2005

Eclipse - UML: SDE for Eclipse Enterprise Edition Released

Eclipse - UML: SDE for Eclipse Enterprise Edition Released
Visual Paradigm is pleased to announce the release of Smart Development Environment 2.1 for Eclipse (SDE-EC), a full featured Eclipse UML plugin that provides the industry's full round-trip code generation and code reverse engineering support for Java in a unified modeling environment with Eclipse. The latest release of SDE-EC features numerous new features and enhancement over the previous version, such as Object Relational Mapping (ORM), Entity Relationship Diagram (ERD), more extensive UML 2.0 coverage, enhanced Sequence Diagram and new freehand connector style (curve).

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BEA Joins Eclipse

BEA Joins Eclipse
BEA Systems (Quote, Chart) said it has joined the Eclipse Foundation and will invest $1.5 million in money, code and personnel in the open source group each year.

The software company will join the consortium as a strategic developer and board member, said Bill Roth, vice president of product marketing at BEA. In related news, Dublin, Calif.-based Sybase (Quote, Chart) also joined Tuesday as a strategic developer.

Roth said on a conference call that BEA will also serve as co-lead of the Web Tools Platform project at Eclipse, as well as proposing a Language Development Tools project to create a multi-language software compiler.

The next version of BEA WebLogic Workshop, code-named Daybreak, will support the Eclipse framework. Daybreak, which Roth said has not set timetable yet, will be tailored to help developers using to have full access to the Eclipse platform as they develop their service-oriented architectures (SOA) (define).

"What we hope to do is bring the ease-of-use we brought into the Java tools community via our Workshop product into the Eclipse community," Roth said.

BEA programmers will also work on blending the application-oriented programming (AOP) project AspectWerkz (part of the BEA JRockit development team) with the Eclipse AspectJ project.

AOP allows properties of a program to determine how it may be executed. Roth said BEA hopes its work here will provide a single, unified platform for AOP. The delivery of AspectJ 5 in the first half of 2005 is expected to contain full support for the new features in Java 5.

Lastly, BEA is offering a free profiler and memory-leak detector for its JRockit software as plug-ins for Eclipse.

After years of resistance, the San Jose, Calif. company's plunge into Eclipse was telegraphed last year when BEA donated Workshop as an open source application framework through the Apache Software Foundation, called Project Beehive.

BEA seemed poised for bigger things after garnering praise and support for a more open approach. Later, Java software maker Instantiations provided code for a project to connect Apache Beehive to the Eclipse project.

The code, a set of plug-ins and user interfaces dubbed Eclipse Pollinate, enables J2EE (define) developers to create advanced applications using Beehive for their networks in the Eclipse IDE (define).

ZapThink analyst Ronald Schmelzer applauded the news.

"It's great that BEA has joined Eclipse and shown, as a result, their commitment to heterogeneity," Schmelzer said. "More specifically, it seems the company now realizes that their platform, as a whole, needs to play in the world of heterogeneity, and I think we can expect to see more announcements like this one on Eclipse that shows how their products will fit in an increasingly service-oriented, heterogeneous world."

What is of interest, Meta Group analyst Thomas Murphy said, is that BEA's move to join Eclipse will result in new synergies between old foes, pointing to BEA's work on AspectWerkz and IBM's work on AspectJ. Ironically, BEA had resisted joining Eclipse for years because it was founded and led by IBM before being spun out last year.

Murphy said a bigger issue lies ahead for Eclipse, which is rooted in Java (define), and stands in stark opposition to Microsoft and its .NET platform.

"The big issue here is: can the community pull together or is it going to fragment?" Murphy wondered. "Everyone except for Sun has some interplay with Eclipse, and beyond Sun, Oracle and a couple small players, Eclipse is the standard IDE."

"It is bigger than that, though. Eclipse isn't just an IDE. It is the foundation for a run-time platform, it is a meta data framework and collaboration foundation. Java's value proposition is interoperability and portability, and this is driven by standards. Without these, the network effect for Java is diminished and this is good for Microsoft and its .NET platform."

Eclipse is expected to show off progress of its various projects at the EclipseCon 2005 conference next week in Burlingame, Calif.

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BEA joins Eclipse open source consortium

BEA joins Eclipse open source consortium
BEA has confirmed it will join the Eclipse Foundation open source consortium.

The company will participate as a top-level "Strategic Developer" member, paying as much as $250,000 per year in dues, and has vowed to ship a commercial product based on Eclipse within one year, Eclipse said. BEA is proposing to lead a language development tools project based on the company's Javelin compiler framework for Java.

BEA has pondered participating in Eclipse for a while. However, the company has its own IDE as part of its WebLogic Workshop toolkit, viewed as a potential rival to the Eclipse IDE. But BEA has previously worked with Eclipse on Pollinate, an open source incubator project that links Project Beehive to the Eclipse IDE. Project Beehive is an open source development based on Workshop.

BEA's participation in Eclipse leaves Sun and Microsoft as the only major vendors not participating in Eclipse. Eclipse was itself founded by IBM in 2001 but has since become an independent entity.

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BEA expected to join Eclipse effort

BEA expected to join Eclipse effort
In a sign of continued realignment in software tools, BEA Systems is slated to formally join the Eclipse effort, industry sources said.

The news is expected to come at EclipseCon 2005 in the US. BEA couldn't be reached for comment.

BEA has been something of a holdout, so far refusing to join IBM, Borland, Red Hat and other companies that back what they call Eclipse's "open platform for tool integration".

IBM created the Eclipse framework in 2001 and three years later spun it off into the Eclipse Foundation, an open-source community.

Every effort since then has been made to keep the group from seeming like an IBM-led effort. The framework has won plaudits even from Microsoft development gurus.

One industry observer said BEA's alliance with Sun Microsystems, another Eclipse holdout, has fractured. Last fall, BEA and IBM defected from a Sun-led push to entrench the Java Business Integration specification. BEA and IBM -- bitter rivals in Web application servers -- instead threw their weight behind the Business Process Execution Language specification.

Some solution providers said BEA's move makes sense, given the Java-centric focus it shares with most of the other Eclipse members. Last year, BEA appeared to move closer to Eclipse with its Project Beehive effort.

"This is kind of a natural fit, another coalition of ABM -- Anybody But Microsoft -- and Anybody But Sun," said Richard Warren, chief solutions architect at MicroLink, a US-based solution provider.

BEA has been moving away from the Sun-led Java Community Process (JCP) for some time, said Shawn Willett, an analyst at research firm Current Analysis. "They're bowing to the inevitable. Eclipse is probably the most powerful standards group for developing tool interfaces," Willett said. "They realise they can't set standards on their own."

It was unclear which membership tier BEA would achieve, but given the company's prominence in application servers, it likely would attain one of the higher "strategic" levels, said one source.

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DB Visual Architect 1.0 for Eclipse (DBVA-EC) Released

DB Visual Architect 1.0 for Eclipse (DBVA-EC) Released
Visual Paradigm is pleased to announce the release of DB Visual Architect for Eclipse (DBVA-EC) 1.0, a full featured Object Relational Mapping (ORM) plugin for Eclipse. It act as a bridge between object model, data model and relational model by automating the mapping between relational rows in a database and object models which can be manipulated by a Java program, and helps realizing UML design to database implementation.

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Tuesday, February 22, 2005

BEA Expected To Join Eclipse Effort

BEA Expected To Join Eclipse Effort
In a sign of continued realignment in software tools, BEA Systems is slated to formally join the Eclipse effort, industry sources said.

The news is expected to come in two weeks at EclipseCon 2005 in Burlingame, Calif. BEA, San Jose, Calif., couldn't be reached for comment.

BEA has been something of a holdout, so far refusing to join IBM, Borland, Red Hat and other companies that back what they call Eclipse's "open platform for tool integration."

IBM created the Eclipse framework in 2001 and three years later spun it off into the Eclipse Foundation, an open-source community.

Every effort since then has been made to keep the group from seeming like an IBM-led effort. The framework has won plaudits even from Microsoft development gurus.

One industry observer said BEA's alliance with Sun Microsystems, another Eclipse holdout, has fractured. Last fall, BEA and IBM defected from a Sun-led push to entrench the Java Business Integration specification. BEA and IBM--bitter rivals in Web application servers--instead threw their weight behind the Business Process Execution Language specification.

Some solution providers said BEA's move makes sense, given the Java-centric focus it shares with most of the other Eclipse members. Last year, BEA appeared to move closer to Eclipse with its Project Beehive effort.

"This is kind of a natural fit, another coalition of ABM--Anybody But Microsoft--and Anybody But Sun," said Richard Warren, chief solutions architect at MicroLink, a Vienna, Va.-based solution provider.

BEA has been moving away from the Sun-led Java Community Process (JCP) for some time, said Shawn Willett, an analyst at research firm Current Analysis. "They're bowing to the inevitable. Eclipse is probably the most powerful standards group for developing tool interfaces," Willett said. "They realize they can't set standards on their own."

It was unclear which membership tier BEA would achieve, but given the company's prominence in application servers, it likely would attain one of the higher "strategic" levels, said one source.

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Wednesday, February 16, 2005

Kenai Systems Introduces Eclipse Plug-in Version of eXamineST

Kenai Systems Introduces Eclipse Plug-in Version of eXamineST
Kenai Systems, Inc., a leading provider of Web services vulnerability assessment and management solutions, today announced the introduction of an Eclipse plug-in version of its eXamineST Web services inspection software. The plug-in will be included in version 1.3 of eXamineST, scheduled to be available on February 18, 2005. This release will be a free upgrade for existing eXamineST licensees, and eXamineST will continue to be offered for $299 per seat. Product downloads and additional information are available at www.kenaisystems.com.

eXamineST enables the development of secure, interoperable Web services by supporting WSDL import and export functions to test for vulnerabilities in Web services incorporating WS-Security and the WS-I interoperability guidelines as a best practice.

"The introduction of eXamineST as an Eclipse plug-in is part of our continuing commitment to provide developers with the best solutions to develop secure Web services," said Bill Kesselring, CEO of Kenai Systems. "Developers will find that eXamineST's integration into their preferred development environment will save time and streamline the development process. The increasing popularity of the Eclipse IDE made our introduction of this plug-in a natural step in the ongoing evolution of the eXamineST Web services security tool for developers."

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Oracle Puts Integration At Its Core

Oracle Puts Integration At Its Core
JDEVELOPER

The JDeveloper environment sports an entirely new interface that's based on the open-source JGoodies components and animation, which are available at Sun's dev.java.net site.

"We targeted it to [Jet-Brains'] IntelliJ and Eclipse users," said Ted Fartell, architect and director of strategy for application development tools.

The light bulb feature In JDeveloper gives suggestions for fixing errors.

Oracle also has released its Application Development Framework, which is a set of graphical user interface components that adhere to the JCP's JavaServer Faces specification.

Oracle claims the tool has a 30 percent performance increase, due to enhancements in database access, caching and asynchronous batch processing.

Several features are aimed at making JDeveloper easier to use.

Although Oracle is part of the Eclipse Foundation, JDeveloper is not Eclipse-based. The company joined the foundation to ensure that Eclipse tools could work with Oracle's application server, said Farrell.

"We want to make sure the customer is successful building to the Oracle database and app server," he said. "We're not forcing them to use JDeveloper to use our runtimes."

Oracle also has plug-ins to work with Borland's JBuilder, he said.

One of the new features aimed at making it a more efficient development tool is a new "light bulb" that suggests fixes for incorrect code. JDeveloper also has a code completion feature that fills in not only keywords, but also variables from imported packages.

In addition, Release 2 of JDeveloper has a feature that shows the differences between versions of a file, even before the file has been saved. This feature works both with its own files and with a source code repository.

New editors include an XML editor, XML schema editor and XSLT mapping tools.

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Intel Lets Users Compile, Analyze Code in Eclipse

Intel Lets Users Compile, Analyze Code in Eclipse
In building applications for Intel processors, many programmers choose to go straight to the source and use software development tools offered by the company that designed the silicon. For developers working in the Eclipse environment, Santa Clara, Calif.- based Intel (www.intel.coni) recently announced support for the platform in both its Intel VTune Performance Analyzer 3.0 and Intel C++ Compiler 8.1 for Linux.

"Eclipse gives us a new and exciting environment to support with our development tools," says James Reinders, director of marketing for Intel's Software Products Division. "We've integrated our C++ compiler under Eclipse and have used it to give our VTune Performance Analyzer for Linux a GUI framework. We're also a part of the Eclipse Test and Performance Tools Platform Project."

Reinders explains that his team comes up with ideas that make Intel processors and the platforms built around them work as well as possible, but unlocking their full potential often takes some work. "That work is done by experts who recognize or develop good tools and know how to use them," he says. "The Eclipse Test and Performance Tools Platform Project is bringing together capabilities like testing, tracing, profiling and monitoring under Eclipse."

Indeed, he says, "we know it's a good idea to have multiple vendors-including Intel-work on this project so that all of the tools plug in to Eclipse and interoperate with each other." Intel has devoted more than a half-dozen of its own engineers to work solely on the Eclipse Test and Performance Tools Platform Project.

The Intel C++ Compiler for Linux provides compatibility with Linux utilities, including make, Emacs and gdb and interprocedure optimization (IPO) to create faster code through inlining, replacing multiple function calls with actual function codes and performing absolute rather than relative addressing wherever possible.

The Intel compiler also provides optimized floatingpoint emulation; the ability to access intrinsic functions from the C++ level for Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) technology at the C++ application level; multi-threaded application support for OpenMP and auto-parallelization; the Intel Debugger; and support for the new Intel Extended Memory 64 Technology (Intel EM64T).

VTune Performance Analyzer for Linux helps developers identify and remove performance bottlenecks on IA-32 systems through a graphical user interface provided by full integration of the Eclipse environment, allowing them to accomplish all analysis and tuning from Linux. Remote data collection can be performed on Linux systems using Intel EM64T, as well as remote IA-32 or Itanium-based Linux systems, and an accurate representation of the software's performance can be obtained using event-based, systemwide sampling.

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Hp Uses Eclipse for App Management and Voice Tools

Hp Uses Eclipse for App Management and Voice Tools
Silicon Valley icon Hewlett-Packard (www.hp.com) has a seemingly endless array of products that serve the consumer, small and medium- size business, and enterprise customer segments. But there's more to HP than printers and desktop PCs: The company, whose slogan is "Invent," is also a technology pioneer that spends $4 billion on research and development each year. So, HP's stamp of approval on Eclipse speaks volumes about the technology.

"HP is a member of the Eclipse board of directors as well as a strategic consumer member," says Philip Ma, HP Eclipse Alliance manager. "Our focus is on leveraging the technology to create Eclipse tools for developers that really extend the capabilities of the base Eclipse platform and that make HP's software platforms more accessible for them."

So far, HP has developed Eclipse-based tools in two main areas: application management and voice telephony. For app management, Eclipse is used in the HP Open View suite of tools, allowing enterprise developers to incorporate application manageability during the development process. HP's telephony software, gathered under the HP OpenCall brand, includes software that allows users to add voice interfaces to Web applications using VoiceXML.

That's just a start. Looking forward, HP is working on making the Eclipse framework available on its HP-UX platform for Itanium-based systems.

HP OpenView Smart Plug-ins are modules that are preconfigured to manage applications. The Smart Plug-ins link with a GUI called the HP OpenView Operations console to extend capabilities and more fully manage business applications, e-commerce platforms, messaging services, databases and Internet infrastructure. Smart Plug-ins show the essential pieces in measuring an application's quality of service.

"As the developer is designing and coding the application, we think it's important for them to think about how that application could be easily managed during deployment," Ma says. "If you design your application to be better managed, then you reduce a lot of the inefficiencies around troubleshooting and trying to correct the application after deployment. Tools for leveraging HP OpenView Smart Plug-in management capabilities can help in that effort."

One of the Eclipse-based tools in the OpenView tool-kit is called the HP OpenView JMX Metric Builder. JMX, or Java Management Extensions, specifies a set of interfaces and a runtime environment for adding management capabilities to Java applications. For J2EE platforms such as BEA WebLogic Server, HP OpenView provides a Smart Plug-in module that can be used to monitor and manage JMX components, called MBeans, for the application server environment as well as the applications running there.


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Eclipse Buzzes About Increasing Membership

Eclipse Buzzes About Increasing Membership
by Rita-Lyn Sanders

February 09, 2005 — Like bumblebees pollinating a flower garden, many companies have swarmed to join Eclipse since it gained its independence from IBM a year ago, pushing the Foundation's budget to about $1.5 million in 2004. Even more companies have begun building plug-ins for the Eclipse environment or have used the toolset to build applications.

In the past year, the Eclipse Foundation has welcomed 26 new companies, a 46 percent increase in membership, including a small but growing number of organizations in the iSeries world.

Just a few weeks ago, Aldon signed on, joining competitors SoftLanding Systems (which joined in September last year) and MKS, a member since September 2002. These vendors share their virtual development lab with iSeries brethren including ASC, Computer Associates, JBoss Inc., Novell, Oracle, Red Hat, SAP, and Teamstudio — not to mention IBM, whose WebSphere Development Studio Client (WDSc) is indisputably the most popular Eclipse plug-in in the iSeries world.

The Eclipse Foundation now counts 82 companies in its membership — nine strategic developers or consumers, 60 add-in providers, and 13 associate members. These companies provide the foundation's budget revenues, with strategic and add-in providers contributing money and often developers to the organization. Strategic member such as IBM and SAP contribute 0.12 percent of their annual revenues, up to $250,000 per year, while add-in providers such as the remaining iSeries participants contribute $5,000 per year.

So what do members get in return for their cash outlay? Plenty, say the three iSeries change-management vendors.

Aldon President and CEO Daniel Magid says his company decided "to take full advantage of the opportunities that Eclipse represents. It brings both vendors and customers the best environment they could ask for," because Eclipse provides a single-vendor solution, so to speak. That is, because many different kinds of tools plug in to the Eclipse development environment, customers can select the tools they want in their IT infrastructures.

Even though Eclipse is fairly young in its adoption cycle, Magid said the number of companies buzzing about Eclipse is increasing. He's starting to hear from more customers asking about the Eclipse capabilities in his products. And an increasing number of vendors offer solutions that enhance the flexibility of the Eclipse environment.

Being an Eclipse member means that these iSeries vendors will be in the middle of the action, says Dave Martin, MKS v.p. of product management, and they'll get the scoop on the hottest technological developments coming down the pike — and can also have a hand in developing them.

"Open-source communities tend to attract the best and brightest individuals," says SoftLanding Marketing Director Amy Lantz, "and they're very willing to share experiences and ideas and help each other solve problems. It's a very interactive, organic experience."

Open-source technology company JBoss Inc. also recently announced its membership. The company joined the ranks of add-in providers so that it could enable its customers to use both Eclipse tools and the JBoss open-source application server through plug-ins that support JBoss tags. "We see Eclipse as the emerging standard in the Java camp, so it's a natural move for us to embrace Eclipse and streamline the experiences of our own users," said Marc Fleury, the CEO of JBoss.

However, Eclipse adoption among iSeries vendors may be slower than in some other technology camps, Magid says, as many iSeries shops already use tools with which they have a high degree of comfort and productivity. "There is a lot of satisfaction with their existing environment," he said. "It makes it hard to get them to move to new things."

The vendors all agree that the big draw for the iSeries crowd is IBM's WebSphere Studio and the WDSc. Eclipse adoption may have been slowed, Lantz says, because "so many IT shops have been sidetracked by Sarbanes-Oxley. They're spending a lot of time on compliance, so they have less time to learn new technology."

Another factor is the lure of Microsoft's competing VisualStudio.NET, Martin says, which many shops have adopted as their preferred development platform. MKS itself also feels torn between the two camps, as it balances its Eclipse membership with its work to support customers who prefer the Redmond alternative. "We certainly don't want to be perceived as being Eclipse-only," he says. "We're reaching out to the .NET community and providing some support there as well. The danger is, if you're too heavily into the Eclipse camp, you tend to peg yourself as one-platform, and that's not always good for the customer."

As other companies learn the benefits of Eclipse like those who've already joined the organization, Eclipse supporters are certain the growth will continue. "Over the next 12 months we expect to experience a steady growth in the number of organizations joining Eclipse," says Mike Milinkovich, executive director of the Eclipse Foundation. "As Eclipse expands its projects across the entire software development lifecycle, the benefits of joining the Eclipse Foundation are becoming important to more and more companies."

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Tuesday, February 08, 2005

Eclipse 3.1 M4 - "Cool New Stuff," Says JDJ's Eclipse Editor Bill Dudney

Eclipse 3.1 M4 - "Cool New Stuff," Says JDJ's Eclipse Editor Bill Dudney
Eclipse 3.1 M4 - "Cool New Stuff," Says JDJ's Eclipse Editor Bill Dudney
Dudney Annotates the "New and Noteworthy" Features of the Latest Release
February 7, 2005

Summary
The Eclipse team is well on the way to the 3.1 release. The current release is M4 with M5 to follow in less than two weeks (M5 is due Feb 18th). "I made the plunge to 3.1M4," reports JDJ's Eclipse editor, Bill Dudney. "I've been using it for about 4 weeks now and here are my notes on the 'new and noteworthy' stuff in the M4 release."


By Bill Dudney

The Eclipse team is well on the way to the 3.1 release. The current release is M4 with M5 to follow in less than two weeks (M5 is due Feb 18th). Given all the cool stuff that is planned for the 3.1 release I've been itching to make the move, but alas my day job was getting in the way of using a beta. Well my day job is still crazy but we had about a week of non-crazyness so I made the plunge to 3.1M4. I've been using it for about 4 weeks now and here are my notes on the 'new and noteworthy' stuff in the M4 release.

There are tons of cool things in the M1 to M3 releases too. I'll try to do a 'retro' commentary on them before the release of M5.

Ant
Ant debugger - yes you read that correctly. You can now debug your ant files. All the typical stuff is there, breakpoints, stepping etc. To invoke the debugger you have to launch from the Ant View. Select 'Debug As -> Ant Build'. The next thing to do here would be to make it possible to run an Ant build script in debug mode and be able to step into the implementation of the tasks.

JDT
J2SE 5.0 Features - tons of cool stuff going on here but I've not had a chance to really use any of it yet because of earlier mentioned day job getting in the way. I hope to be on 5.0 by mid to late March so I'll have lots more to say then. However just a few quick highlights of what's new. Searching is able to understand most of the 5.0 syntax (generic types etc), code assist is working with annotation types, navigation with the F3 key is working, autoboxing is now in the compiler, quick fixes for generics. There is too much to give property treatment here and since I've not had a chance to dig in my self I'll leave it at that. If you are playing around with 5.0 though you should definitely take a look at the M4 release.

Multi-Working Set Support - Its now possible to specify multiple working sets at the same time. This is a big win for code organization on big projects. Essentially it turns the Package Explorer into a working set explorer. In other words your working sets become top level elements.

Spell checking properties files - Key for me since I rarely spell my own name right. Not as helpful as it could be because meat passes where meet should be, ah if only we could have the computer read my mind instead of me typing out my thoughts.

Navigate from a property to usages - this is a really cool feature. From the properties editor you can click through to where the property is referenced in your java code. Java Editor preferences rearranged - still hard to find what I'm looking for but better. One of the coolest things added in M4 around the preferences is a navigation history. We now have a 'back button' so that Eclipse remembers where we have been and can take us back there. The back button and history work for all preferences, not just the JDT set.

JUnit Tests - The JUnit view now has a really cool button to rerun the failing tests first. So for example if you have 20 tests for a particular class and the final 2 tests were failing. Instead of having to wait for the other 18 to pass you can run the 2 failing tests first. Cool!

Variables View - you can specify a logical way for a variable to be rendered in the variable view. So instead of seeing all the gory detail for your class in the variables view you can specify that you only see what you want. You access this very cool feature in the preferences Java -> Debug -> Logical Structures.

MultiProject Import - you can now import more than one project at a time. I rarely use this feature except when upgrading so its not that important for me but cool anyway. It will be a big time saver for the folks with lots of projects that upgrade only on the official release cycles.

Team and CVS

CVS Commit Review - when you commit the dialog now contains the files being committed, so we can be more accurate in commit messages (I'm sure this will change my really bad habit of putting 'changed some stuff' into my commit messages).

CVS file type support improved - When you add a bunch of files Eclipse no longer assumes unknown files are binary. Instead it pops up a dialog with the list of file extensions and gives you a chance to specify. It defaults them all to binary so you can just click the finish button if you don't care. This is a great feature but was very slow for me when adding a bunch of files to a repository.

Platform Core

Eclipse Startup - you can now start eclipse from the command line as a jar file. java -jar ?eclipse/startup.jar'

Platform Text

Shared editor preferences - finally! Now all the text editors in Eclipse will share a common set of settings. Of course that will make me irritated when I want my XML indented 4 and my Java indented 2. But I won't complain because I complained that they did not share a common set of preferences.

Hyper link support - now in all editors. The Java editor support was generalized and put into the core text editor.


There is tons more to write about that was new and noteworthy in M1 to M3. I'll try to get that put together RSN.


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Friday, February 04, 2005

SYS-CON Media Opens Its Eighth Annual "Readers' Choice Awards"

SYS-CON Media Opens Its Eighth Annual "Readers' Choice Awards" Polls
SYS-CON Media, the world's leading i-technology media company, announced that its 2005 Readers' Choice Awards polls opened today, February 1, 2005, and will remain open for six months, until July 31, 2005. More than 50,000 readers are expected to cast their votes to select the best software products and services of the year for Java, Linux, Web Services, XML, Microsoft .NET, ColdFusion and Macromedia MX.

1) 2005 JDJ Readers' Choice Awards - Best Java Book Nominees:
The Java Developer's Guide to Eclipse (IBM Press)
Eclipse: Building Commercial-Quality Plug-Ins (Instantiations, Inc.)

2) 2005 JDJ Readers' Choice Awards - Best Database Tool or Driver Nominees:
EclipseUML Omondo (Omondo)

4) 2005 JDJ Readers' Choice Awards - Best Java Application Nominees:
Eclipse (Eclipse Foundation)
EclipseUML (Omondo)

8) 2005 JDJ Readers' Choice Awards - Best Java Debugging Tool Nominees:
Eclipse (Eclipse Foundation)

9) 2005 JDJ Readers' Choice Awards - Best Java IDE Environment Nominees:
Eclipse (Eclipse Foundation)

16) 2005 JDJ Readers' Choice Awards - Best Team Development Tool Nominees:
Eclipse (Eclipse Foundation)

18) 2005 JDJ Readers' Choice Awards - Most Innovative Java Product Nominees:
Eclipse (Eclipse Foundation)
EclipseUML (Omondo)

22) 2005 JDJ Readers' Choice Awards - Best Java Class Library Nominees:
SWT 3.0 (Eclipse Foundation)

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IBM Announces New Generation of Faculty Awards for Innovation

IBM Announces New Generation of Faculty Awards for Innovation
In support of the National Innovation Initiative, IBM today announced new faculty awards to support university researchers focused on specific areas of innovation including Autonomic Computing, Apache Derby, Eclipse and Linux on POWER. The new Faculty Awards for Innovation will nearly double IBM's Faculty Award commitment to this type of open source technology research, totaling over $5 million in cash awards in the last two years. With over $70 million in shared university research (SUR) technology grants, IBM has provided over $100 million in technology and funding to universities and colleges to drive collaborative innovation.

Designed to support research in areas essential to fueling innovation, these Faculty Awards address recommendations from the National Innovation Initiative's Council on Competitiveness to increase investment in research and create new forms of collaboration to bolster America's role as the world's economic engine. These awards further represent IBM's drive for collaborative innovation. Working with universities and others to solve real-world problems and the donation of 500 IBM patents to the open source community are two types of examples.

IBM also works with universities and colleges through the IBM Academic Initiative, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC), the long-standing IBM PhD Fellowship Program, and many other efforts to stimulate high-value, open IT skills to develop a more competitive IT workforce capable of driving innovation and economic growth. In addition, IBM provides recruitment channels to identify the best and brightest candidates for a diverse, innovative workforce.

"Partnering with faculty is a key priority for IBM as we support the innovative and important research taking place at universities around the world," said Jane Harper, Director, University Relations and Innovation Programs. "These Faculty Awards will help open doors to new research while enabling faculty to teach and drive innovation in the open source community."

The new awards will support over 90 researchers at universities worldwide to encourage innovative research using open source technologies. The awards will support topics that feature innovation in teaching, research or community-building around Eclipse (eclipse.org), the Apache Derby open-source relational database management system (incubator.apache.org/derby), Autonomic Computing technologies (research.ibm.com/autonomic), and Linux on POWER (www.ibm.com/linux).

This cycle of Faculty Awards expands upon the success of IBM's Eclipse Innovation Grant program, which has awarded grants to academic researchers over the past two years to encourage the active use of Eclipse. Examples of some of the new Faculty Awards include:

-- Bug Awareness

Gail Murphy, University of British Columbia This project will analyze bug databases for bug similarity to reduce the volume of bugs and show developers bugs that are similar. This work is significant for the Eclipse open-source community and also will impact bug tracking systems outside the Eclipse community.

-- An Extensible Eclipse-Based Application for Molecular and Mesoscale Simulation, David Kofke, State University of New York, Buffalo This project will research mesoscale analysis that can be applied to the atmosphere and used by the National Weather Service to predict thunderstorms, tornadoes and earthquakes.

-- Fluid Architecture -- Turbocharging Automated Agile-Design Refactorings with Aspect-Oriented Programming

William Griswold, University of California -- San Diego (UCSD)

This project will research refactoring for aspect-oriented programming. Refactoring is a key leading-edge programming and software engineering technology related to enhancing the quality of code to make it easier to maintain with fewer errors.


Eclipse

Eclipse is an open-source community that creates technology and an open universal platform for tools integration. Eclipse-based tools give developers freedom of choice in a multi-language, multi-platform, multi- vendor supported environment. Eclipse delivers a plug-in based framework that makes it easier to create, integrate and use software tools, saving time and money. By collaborating and sharing core integration technology, tool producers can concentrate on their areas of expertise and the creation of new development technology. The Eclipse Platform is written in the Java language, and comes with extensive plug-in construction toolkits and examples. It has already been deployed on a range of development workstations including HP-UX, Solaris, AIX, Linux, MAC OS X, QNX and Windows-based systems.


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