Saturday, April 30, 2005

IBM Tivoli plan knits in Rational tools | CNET News.com

IBM Tivoli plan knits in Rational tools | CNET News.com
IBM next month plans to highlight products from its Tivoli systems management division meant to reduce glitches in complex business applications.

he initiative, which will be detailed in May, aims to smooth out the process of making changes, such as updates or security patches, to applications, said Al Zollar, general manager of the Tivoli division. Zollar took over as chief of IBM Software's Tivoli division after heading up Big Blue's iSeries mid-range server and Lotus divisions.

The products, which will be released this year, are being developed by Tivoli but will draw on existing software in IBM's Rational tools division, he said.

"One of the things that's important, from an IBM perspective, is that we are bringing together capabilities and assets that many competitors don't have," Zollar said.

The intent behind the forthcoming product announcement is to provide tools that allow programmers to add useful management information to business applications during the development process, he said. For example, a developer could set an application's desired performance thresholds and security policies in application code.
.
.
.

The products will be released as plug-ins to the Eclipse software, which allows IT professionals to use different tools via a single user interface.

The new Tivoli management tools will be particularly useful for complex business applications that include several components and that also might be running on different machines, he said.

"We've created a standardized way of using XML to create (program) package definitions that include the ability to check dependencies and have that drive the provisioning engine of Tivoli," said Zollar.

Other Eclipse plug-ins under development will be aimed at monitoring applications.

Read complete article. . .

Thursday, April 28, 2005

Genomatica Deploys Versant Open Access JDO, Endorses Versant-Proposed Eclipse JSR220-ORM Project

Genomatica Deploys Versant Open Access JDO, Endorses Versant-Proposed Eclipse JSR220-ORM Project
Versant Corporation (Nasdaq: VSNT - News), an industry leader in specialized data management and data persistence software, today announced that Genomatica, a leading computational systems biology company, has deployed Versant Open Access JDO as a key component of SimPheny, their software platform for systems biology. Genomatica also endorses the proposed Eclipse JSR220-ORM project, which will be led by Versant. Versant Open Access JDO forms the initial code base of the proposed Eclipse JSR220-ORM project, resulting in a standards-based, open source, object-relational mapping (ORM) technology. Versant Open Access JDO was Genomatica's top choice for object-relational mapping, beating out several other standards-based solutions, and replacing an existing non-standard, object-relational mapping product. Genomatica also selected Versant to provide professional services to help convert their application. Genomatica believes that the Eclipse JSR220-ORM project is the best strategy for further developing this technology and expanding its use. Object-relational mapping is a software infrastructure that translates the data formats used in the object-oriented languages preferred by programmers to the relational structure of common databases.

"Versant Open Access JDO gives us the ability to transparently support complex mapping patterns and existing relational schema," explained Evelyn Travnik, chief software designer at Genomatica. "After our dissatisfaction with our previous object-relational mapping solution, the prospect that the technology will be part of a standards-based, open source solution in the Eclipse family is a big positive for us. The Eclipse community is one of the leading open source communities in Java, and brings a record of quality and success. Versant's professional services where also very helpful in getting our application converted to JSR220-ORM."

Read complete article. . .

Wednesday, April 27, 2005

Visual Paradigm is pleased to announce the release of DB Visual Architect for Eclipse (DBVA-EC) 1.0

Visual Paradigm is pleased to announce the release of DB Visual Architect for Eclipse (DBVA-EC) 1.0
Visual Paradigm is pleased to announce the release of DB Visual Architect for Eclipse ( DBVA-EC ) 1.0, a full featured Object Relational Mapping ( ORM ) plugin for Eclipse. It act as a bridge between object model, data model and relational model by automating the mapping between relational rows in a database and object models which can be manipulated by a Java program, and helps realizing UML design to database implementation.


DBVA-EC 1.0 support Object Relational Mapping ( ORM ) and ER Diagram ( ERD ) extensively. The tool helps generating the persistent Java source code you need to access database( s ). It provides multiple database support which allows you to access various DBMS ( MYSQL, Oracle, HSQLDB, MS SQL, Sybase ¡K ) with the same set of persistent source code. Another feature is the ability to generate database from Class Diagram or ER Diagrams. You can design your application with Class Diagram and ERD within the industry¡¦s best visual modeling environment, and generate database table from the resulting diagrams. DBVA-EC also facilitate in the reverse engineering of relational database( s ). You can reverse engineer legacy database system ( DB2, HypersonicSQL, MS SQL, MySQL, Oracle, Pointbase, Sybase, jTDS ¡K ) to Class Diagram and ERD.

Read complete article. . .

Tuesday, April 26, 2005

Two database projects afoot in Eclipse

Two database projects afoot in Eclipse
A tale of dueling open source projects for object-relational mapping may be brewing within Eclipse, with similar proposals floated separately by Versant and Oracle.

Versant on Tuesday proposed that it will lead an effort for standards-based object-relational mapping based on JSR 220. The specification defines a standard for object-relational mapping in Java. Specifically, the Versant effort is being called the JSR-220 ORM (object-relational mapping) project within Eclipse.

Read complete article. . .

Monday, April 25, 2005

IBM turns to small businesses, releases new WebSphere MQ 6.0

IBM turns to small businesses, releases new WebSphere MQ 6.0
IBM has released a new version of its software WebSphere MQ and hopes to rope in small and medium business markets into its fold. The new version, WebSphere MQ 6.0, boasts an incredible 150 technical improvements, which include an improved support for creating an enterprise service bus (ESB), which is indispensable to a SOA.

The ESB will be based on the Eclipse open source Java development platform.

Scott Cosby, Program Director for WebSphere Business Integration, revealed, "We have 12,000 [WebSphere MQ] users, some with 50,000-plus deployments, so we are talking half a billion to 700 million instances of MQ out there. With version 6.0, you can turn the switch on and now have each of those instances become a service both sending and receiving. This is important when thinking about building an SOA."

Read complete article. . .

Two Object Relational Mapping Projects Proposed for Eclipse

Two Object Relational Mapping Projects Proposed for Eclipse
Hot on the heels of Oracle’s recent announcement of its proposed Eclipse project to support the Enterprise Java Beans (EJB) 3.0 specification, Versant, a data management company, has proposed an Eclipse initiative that appears to stake out the same territory.

The Versant proposal would provide an implementation of its object-relational mapping (ORM) technology that is 100 percent compliant with the EJB 3.0 specification (JSR 220) and the Java Data Objects spec (JSR 243), integrated with the Eclipse platform.

The Oracle project aims to build an open-source EJB 3.0 ORM tool that focuses on design-time tooling and supports deployment to any J2EE-compatible application server.

The Oracle project will be based on its Toplink mapping workbench, which is the design-time developer tool used for object-to-relational mapping, says Dennis Leung, VP of development in Oracle’s application server group. The project will not include the Toplink runtime, Leung says.

The Versant project, JSR220-ORM, will be based the previously commercial implementation of the Versant Open Access product, which is now open source. The Versant plan also involves tracking the changes to these specifications, so that as they merge in the future toward a common persistence standard, it will be fully implemented by this project. Additionally, Versant plans to provide visual development tools that facilitate round-trip engineering when using the JSR 220/243 approach to persistence.

Read complete article. . .

Friday, April 22, 2005

Review of 'Eclipse 3 Live'

Review of 'Eclipse 3 Live'
TBR writes "The book is an introduction to the use of Eclipse as a Java IDE, as such the use of the Eclipse for other languages or for plug-in development is not covered. The focus is very much on showing the reader how to get the best out of Eclipse for general Java development. No prior experience of Eclipse is assumed, so the book opens with instructions on downloading and installation and then it's down to work."

Read complete TechBookReport. . .

Open-source object-relational projects brew in Eclipse

Open-source object-relational projects brew in Eclipse
A tale of dueling open-source projects for object-relational mapping may be brewing within Eclipse, with similar proposals floated by Versant Corp. and Oracle Corp.

Versant plans to announce on Tuesday that it has proposed to lead an effort for standards-based object-relational mapping based on Java Specification Request (JSR) 220. The specification defines a standard for object-relational mapping in Java. Specifically, the Versant effort is being called the JSR-220 object-relational mapping project within Eclipse.

Key to the endeavor is Fremont, Calif.-based Versant's plan to offer the Versant Open Access object-relational mapping tool as an open-source tool. With Open Access, Versant is contributing mapping tools and run times for both the Enterprise JavaBeans 3.0 and the Java Data Objects 2.0 standards. EJB and JDO are being merged over time.

However, Oracle announced last week a similar initiative within Eclipse, in which the company will help build an open-source EJB-based object-relational mapping tool under the Eclipse public license.

"All I can say is you'd have to ask Eclipse," about how two separate initiatives have sprung up, said Robert Greene, vice president of product strategy at Versant. "We did not know of Oracle's initiative, and I don't believe that Oracle knew of ours."

"At this point, they're both proposals, and we'll see how we can perhaps work together to consolidate where it makes sense," Greene said. Versant this week plans to discuss possibly consolidating its project with Oracle's. Oracle on Monday couldn't be reached for comment.

Read complete article. . .

Tuesday, April 19, 2005

Wind River unveils Eclipse Device Software Development project

Wind River unveils Eclipse Device Software Development project
Wind River Systems and the Eclipse Foundation has announced that Wind River will propose and lead an Eclipse Device Software Development Platform project, the first project specifically for device software development.

With the Device Software Development Project, Wind River is bringing its expertise in device software development and run-time solutions to the Eclipse community to foster industry standardization and innovation to help companies develop and run device software better, faster, more reliably and at a lower cost.

Eclipse is an open source community whose projects are focused on providing an extensible development platform and application frameworks for building software. The Eclipse Foundation is a not-for-profit, member supported corporation that hosts the Eclipse projects.

Mike Milinkovich, Executive Director, Eclipse Foundation, Inc., said, "The goal of Eclipse is to create a universal development platform to enable global enterprises to develop software more efficiently. Wind River has deep experience in device software and will provide the vision, technology and resources to enhance the Eclipse platform specifically for embedded software development. The addition of the Device Software Development Platform project will help expand Eclipse's presence in embedded computing, a key focus area for the foundation as outlined in the recently unveiled Eclipse Roadmap."

John Bruggeman, Chief Marketing Officer, Wind River, said, "By bringing the Device Software Development Project to the market, Wind River will help change the way device software development is done. Manufacturers will now be able to standardize on choice, using a widely accepted, fully integrated development platform that supports all Eclipse technologies and is backed by an unprecedented ecosystem of industry-leading companies."

Read complete article. . .

Eclipse To Pursue Open-Source Tools For Parallel Computing

Eclipse To Pursue Open-Source Tools For Parallel Computing
Effort will allow tools for building parallel-processing applications to work together.

The Eclipse Foundation is forging ahead with an attempt to bring order to the fragmented field of tools for building software to run on parallel computers.

Parallel computers are usually found at universities, research institutions, and businesses where large, centralized data warehouses, such as Wal-Mart's Teradata system, are used.

The foundation will team up with the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a parallel-computing user, to make Eclipse a central host for many parallel-computing tools. Under the Eclipse approach, many tools plug into its programmer's workbench and work together by passing development work from one tool to another.

"Los Alamos knows firsthand the pain of using many parallel-programming tools and trying to make them work together," says Greg Watson, project leader in Los Alamos' Advanced Computing Laboratory. Different parallel computers tend to have their own tools, and software can't be moved between them without being reworked. There's even little integration among the different tools for the same type of parallel machine, he adds.

The foundation has launched a Parallel Tools Platform Project to produce open-source tools for use in parallel computing. Parallel computing allows one large task to be subdivided and its individual parts run on separate processors, yielding complex computing results much faster, Watson says.

"Parallelized" development tools produce software that solves problems by arranging them into subdivided tasks that are assigned to parallel processors. A leading example of parallel processing is the Google search engine. It doesn't methodically conduct a search of the Google index of the Internet from end to end when pursuing a keyword. It breaks the task down into many parts, with independent processors each conducting part of the search. In that way, it returns results much faster, Urs Hoelzle, Google's VP of engineering, told attendees at the EclipseCon user conference in Burlingame, Calif., early last month.

Read complete article. . .

Eclipse Project Takes on Parallel Computing

Eclipse Project Takes on Parallel Computing
Development tools for parallel computer systems tend to be architecture-specific, difficult to integrate and fairly basic. Parallel application developers often find themselves juggling tools to match the different machines, shifting gears from stark command-line interfaces and text editors to a range of graphical user interfaces.

Greg Watson believes there should be a better way. As a researcher in Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Advanced Computing Lab, Watson investigates (among other things) tools for parallel computing systems. “The current state of development tools for these machines is pretty primitive,” he says. “It’s really time current practice in this area caught up with best practice of the computing industry.”

Watson found the means to that end in 2004 at the first-ever EclipseCon trade show. “I was really impressed with the capabilities of the Eclipse environment, and it occurred to me that it could provide a way of integrating the disparate parallel computing tools.”

Inspiration lead to six months of perspiration, a proof of concept and finally, this week, the announcement of the Parallel Tools Platform Project, a new Eclipse Technology project aimed at creating better open-source software tools for parallel computers. Los Alamos and Watson will lead the project, collaborating with institutions and companies worldwide to develop an open-source platform that will enable their products to operate on a wide range of parallel computing platforms.

Read Complete Article. . .

Sun and Eclipse - A Marriage Made in Heaven

Sun and Eclipse - A Marriage Made in Heaven
A compelling idea for some, but the astronomical references actually appear to be part of the stumbling block, believe it or not. Word from within Sun has it that the senior executive team is upset over the naming of the Eclipse project - an Open Source Software project that was launched by IBM - could that be the eclipse of the Sun? Well, if we are to invoke the playground mentality, we could just as easily say that eclipses are temporary and the sunshine always breaks through. As psychotherapists like to tell us: we inflict the hurt on ourselves. One cannot help but think Sun needs a dose of psychotherapy, because if it did join the Eclipse project it would truly be a marriage made in programming heaven for software developers, and certainly for the many Java developers.

THE BIG PICTURE

The Eclipse project is a runaway success, and this is now undisputed. Last week in OpinionWire my colleague Teresa Jones talked about BEA joining the board of Eclipse, and now we can report that Borland has also done the same. Hitherto Borland had stayed on the fence, although providing some plug-ins to the Eclipse platform, but now it has joined the Eclipse Foundation Board of Directors as a Strategic Developer. Part of this initiative includes the commitment of a full-time development team to expand the Eclipse platform, for example, Borland will be making its upcoming Model Driven Architecture modelling tools available on Eclipse (and naturally on its own JBuilder product, as well as Microsoft's Visual Studio.NET). Besides Microsoft, this leaves Sun as the last remaining significant developer tool player outside the Eclipse project.

Eclipse has emerged as a significant development and application platform, its Open Source Software (OSS) Java Integrated Development Environment (IDE), ostensibly a demonstration tool of what can be achieved with the platform, is so feature-rich that it has been displacing other Java IDEs from the market to attain most popular position. Other vendors now find it more fruitful to plug into this IDE and offer more advanced functionality. The developer community benefits from being able to work within one familiar tool platform, with excellent tool interoperability.

Read complete article. . .

Eclipse focuses on parallel systems development tools

Eclipse focuses on parallel systems development tools
The Eclipse Foundation and Los Alamos National Laboratory on Tuesday are formally announcing the Parallel Tools Platform Project to furnish better open-source software tools for parallel computers.

The Eclipse-based project is intended to provide a portable parallel development environment that can boost productivity at the engineering level.

"What we're trying to do is address a deficiency in development tools for parallel application developers," said Greg Watson, project leader in the Los Alamos Advanced Computing Laboratory. Los Alamos hopes to provide deliverables based on the project by September; commercial vendors can base products on the technology, according to Watson.

Citing the industry movement toward commodity-based systems such as clustered computers, Eclipse and Los Alamos said developers must deal with a greater complexity of systems and disparate tools. In the fragmented parallel tools market, developers currently cope with a profusion of interfaces ranging from command-line tools and text editors to graphical user interfaces. Developers must change tools every time they move to a new parallel machine, IBM and Los Alamos said. There is little integration between the tools, the organizations added.

Read complete article. . .

Oracle warms to Eclipse with open-source project

Oracle warms to Eclipse with open-source project
Oracle has proposed a project to the Eclipse open-source foundation to ease creation of high-end Java applications.

The company said it intends to spearhead the Eclipse project and make contributions that are compatible with Oracle's TopLink software, which simplifies database development. Oracle intends to create commercial products based on the Eclipse project within a year under the Eclipse open-source license, company executives said.

The Eclipse software provides a framework for plugging in third-party components. Using Eclipse, a programmer can combine different tools, such as modeling and code-editing, in a single user interface.

The purpose of the Oracle-led project is to promote usage of new database-access features being built into Java server software, Oracle executives said.

The Eclipse initiative also allows Oracle to reach out to Java programmers who use Eclipse, a popular development environment, said Dennis MacNeil, director of J2EE tools at Oracle.

In the first quarter of next year, an update to the Java 2 Enterprise Edition server standard will include improvements to the Enterprise Java Beans specification.

Programmers use Enterprise Java Beans for writing server-side programs that are designed for high-end business applications. For example, a developer would use the EJBs to write a transaction that pulled information from many databases.

EJB version 3.0, which will be part of a larger J2EE 5.0 update, is being designed to greatly ease the creation of these server Java programs.

Read complete article. . .

Wednesday, April 13, 2005

Los Alamos Developing New Eclipse-Based Tools for High-Performance Parallel Computers

Los Alamos Developing New Eclipse-Based Tools for High-Performance Parallel Computers
The Eclipse Foundation and Los Alamos National Laboratory today announced the Parallel Tools Platform Project, a new Eclipse Technology project aimed at creating better open source software tools for parallel computers. Los Alamos will lead the project and will collaborate with institutions and companies worldwide to develop an open source platform that will enable their products to operate on a wide range of parallel computing platforms.

As high-end computing moves from one-of-a-kind machines to commodity-based systems such as clustered computers, developers must deal with a greater complexity of systems and a wide array of disparate tools. Given the fragmentation of the parallel tools market today, developers make do with a profusion of interfaces, from minimal command line tools and text editors to tools with different graphical user interfaces. Some of these software tools are available only for specific systems, so the tools must be changed every time that work is moved to a new parallel machine. In addition, there is little integration between tools from different vendors, making it difficult to use modern software engineering techniques.

"Los Alamos knows first-hand the pain of using many parallel programming tools and trying to make them work together before we can get to the critical task of solving tough scientific and industrial problems," said Greg Watson, project leader in Los Alamos' Advanced Computing Laboratory. "The Parallel Tools Platform Project can eliminate this pain point once and for all by providing a single, portable, consistent and highly integrated parallel development environment that will significantly drive productivity at the engineering level. Eclipse provides the ideal extensible platform to involve the open source community, as well as industry, universities and other laboratories."

The project aims to extend the Eclipse platform to build up a user-friendly environment for parallel computer systems. Los Alamos staff and their collaborators at other institutions plan to add support for a wide range of parallel architectures, provide an integrated parallel debugger and develop infrastructure to assist in the integration of other parallel tools. A separate, but related, component of the project will be to add Fortran language support to the Eclipse integrated development environment.

The Eclipse Foundation will supply overall the open-source infrastructure in which code developers and collaborators can work. Eclipse is a community of open source software projects that build developer tools and frameworks. The Eclipse framework provides a robust, full-featured, commercial-quality, industry platform for the development of highly integrated programming tools. Companies such as IBM, Intel and Hewlett-Packard include Eclipse technology in their commercial software products.

"Los Alamos National Laboratory is an innovator and leader in the use of parallel computing," said Mike Milinkovich, executive director of the Eclipse Foundation. "The addition of the Parallel Tools Platform Project supports the Eclipse vision for integrated open source tools that enable organizations to extend the Eclipse platform to support different programming needs. We are delighted that Los Alamos has decided to lead the project to develop tools for parallel programming."

A key project goal of the project is to transform current practice into best practice for parallel application development, while providing support for software vendors to bring their proprietary computing tools into the larger open-source computing environment. Both Los Alamos and the Eclipse Foundation are encouraging other interested parties to become involved in the design and development of the Parallel Tools Platform, particularly parallel tool developers and vendors.

For more information about the Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform Project, or to become involved, please visit http://www.eclipse.org/ptp/.

Read complete article. . .

Eclipse Goes Big

Eclipse Goes Big
As the market for software becomes bullish, a lot of attention is being showered on new open source development tools and frameworks. The star example today is the Eclipse Foundation's namesake IDE.

Eclipse has become one of the top open source projects in the world. In November 2001, banking on its success with Apache, IBM decided to further invest in Linux and donated $40 million of code to create this project. This open source project was intended to "eclipse" Microsoft's VisualStudio.

Read complete article. . .

Sunday, April 10, 2005

Pegasystems Joins Eclipse Foundation

Pegasystems Joins Eclipse Foundation
Pegasystems Inc. the leading provider of smart business process management (BPM) software, today announced its membership in the Eclipse Foundation, a community committed to the implementation of a universal development platform. Pegasystems has demonstrated its flagship PegaRULES Process Commander BPM product integrated with the Eclipse framework.

Pegasystems' J2EE SmartBPM Suite offers a rich environment for developing composite Services Oriented Business Applications that leverage components of Pegasystems' PegaRULES Process Commander. IT and business process owners collaborate using PegaRULES Process Commander capabilities, eliminating a common cause of gaps between management goals and execution. Pegasystems' Eclipse plug-ins will empower developers to leverage rules-driven BPM to align their implementations with changes contributed by business users.

PegaRULES Process Commander's service centric architecture empowers the Java developer to deploy all capabilities through both web services and an embedded Java deployment model. Now Eclipse developers can more quickly and easily develop advanced event-driven service oriented solutions using Pegasystems proven rules-based BPM components. This permits integrated execution, testing and diagnosis with new and existing Java applications while simultaneously allowing the deployment of the same functionality in the Web Services and Batch environments.

"The BPM market continues to evolve," said Jim Sinur, Vice President and Distinguished Analyst at Gartner Research. "Companies and vendors are increasingly evaluating how the adoption of industry standards can contribute to the effectiveness of business process management."

As a strong advocate for open systems, platform independence and customer choice, Pegasystems will continue to support tools and standards such as Eclipse that will help bring the benefits of smart BPM to the developer community.

"Pegasystems' expertise in helping businesses manage change and continuous improvement is a valuable asset for the Eclipse community," said Mike Milinkovich, Executive Director of the Eclipse Foundation. "We look forward to their continued involvement and advocacy of the Eclipse platform."

Read complete article. . .

Wednesday, April 06, 2005

DataMirror Joins Eclipse Foundation

DataMirror Joins Eclipse Foundation

DataMirror today announced it is joining the Eclipse Foundation, a non-profit corporation formed to advance the creation and support of the Eclipse platform, as an Add-In Provider. As part of its commitment, DataMirror also announced today its support for the Eclipse platform with the inclusion of an Eclipse IDE plugin for DataMirror PointBase(R) 5.2, DataMirror's Java database.

DataMirror customers use the PointBase database in their Java applications to reduce their time to market and development costs. More and more Java developers are choosing to use the Eclipse IDE to develop their applications. The Eclipse IDE plugin enables Java developers to write and test both JDBC and SQL code within the Eclipse IDE, further shortening the development, maintenance, and quality-assurance cycles.

"By joining the Eclipse Foundation, DataMirror has demonstrated its commitment to supporting all of the leading Java integrated development environments," says Nigel Stokes, CEO, DataMirror. "DataMirror understands the needs of Java developers and by combining the Eclipse plugin with PointBase, DataMirror is encouraging the trend towards giving organizations the freedom to choose the platform and development environment in which they want to work."

The Eclipse plugin for PointBase is available at no charge for existing PointBase customers as an executable file, or in open source format.

Read complete article. . .

Friday, April 01, 2005

Founding member of Eclipse to join board of directors, lead modelling advancements in Eclipse framework

Founding member of Eclipse to join board of directors, lead modelling advancements in Eclipse framework
Founding member of Eclipse to join board of directors, lead modelling advancements in Eclipse framework
Borland Software Corporation, the global leader for software delivery optimisation solutions, today announced a significant expansion in the company's support for Eclipse, an open source community and universal development platform supporting multiple languages, deployment platforms and technologies.

Borland will play a new leadership role in advancing Eclipse technology by joining the Eclipse Foundation board of directors as a strategic developer. The company will also commit a full-time development team to expand the Eclipse platform and contribute to areas such as modelling that play an important role in Borland's vision for software delivery optimisation.

Read complete article. . .