Monday, May 30, 2005

M7® Debuts NitroX™ JSF IDE for Eclipse

M7® Debuts NitroX™ JSF IDE for Eclipse
M7 Corporation, Inc., the leader in web application development tools based on open source and open standard technologies, today introduced NitroX JSF IDE. NitroX was created to be the most comprehensive tool to meet the needs of professional Java™ developers building web applications based on open standards such as JSF, Struts and JSP. As open source and open standard technologies have continued to thrive, M7 has continued to deliver professional tools to support the development for these open standards. NitroX JSF IDE provides the following key benefits:

Synchronized and Simultaneous Source and Visual JSF Development
NitroX extends its critically acclaimed visual editor to support WYSIWYG development with JSF components within JavaServer Pages. JSF components can be visualized at design time with support for drag/drop of JSF CORE and JSF HTML tag libraries and includes context sensitive wizards that assist in the creation of new artifacts.

Intelligent Context Sensitive JSF Source Editor
NitroX AppXRay™ extends the intelligent level of code completion and error checking efficiency to JSF development within the source editor. Code completion, error checking and validation of JSF components are readily available including intelligence of variables and methods of related managed beans. Hyperlink-style navigation (AppXnavigator™) is expanded to support the JSF framework thereby making navigation through the various elements, a trivial task.

JavaServer Faces Configuration
NitroX offers a Navigation and Forms editor views for the faces-config.xml configuration file. Both editors benefit from the depth of intelligence that AppXRay provides and the unique ability of simultaneously synchronized, 2-way, source and visual editing.

Reaction from Developers
”I have been looking at IDE's that support JSF technology for some time. M7's NitroX for JSF provides both drag-and-drop capabilities as well as maintaining a strong ability to work with the underlying code easily. NitroX for JSF is by far the easiest IDE I've used for JSF development. Its JSP editor with split code/screen capabilities actually make developing JSP/JSF pages enjoyable. The debugging of your application from the JSP page itself down into the guts of the code makes problem resolution much easier.”
- Lee M Seidel, Manager, EC/Web Enterprises, Capital BlueCross

"Web development these days requires knowledge of a plethora of different artifacts. Unfortunately, most tools don't understand how those artifacts are related. M7's NitroX for JSF has a keen understanding of your project, and it lets you know when something is out of synch. Add in a nice WYSIWYG editor, two-way tools, and Eclipse support, and you've got a winning package. Once you begin working with a tool this smart, it's hard to go back."
Kito D. Mann, editor-in-chief, JSF Central

Pricing and Availability
NitroX JSF IDE is priced at $499. A new purchase includes a one-year subscription for product updates, bug fixes and includes major version upgrades of the product that become available during the term of the subscription. No version games, just pure productivity. To purchase, please visit: www.m7.com or contact M7 Sales at email protected from spam bots (1.866.770.9770).
• Details for NitroX JSF IDE at: http://www.m7.com/jsf.jsp
• Download is available at: http://www.m7.com/downloadNitroX.do

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Thursday, May 26, 2005

Prosilog announces Magillemo V3.0

Prosilog announces Magillemo V3.0
Prosilog SA, a leading provider of innovative solutions for SoC design and verification, announces a major new release 3.0 of its Magillem platform based design tool. This release combines advanced features to enable faster platform based designs with the support of the Eclipse* open development environment.

Magillem V3.0 is leveraging the powerful plug-ins capabilities from the Eclipse framework combined with an internal data structure API in order to deliver a consistent user interface for the designer. Within Magillem V3.0, developers still benefit from the SPIRIT Packager module, that provides capabilities to generate a SPIRIT** 1.1 compliant XML from their current VHDL/Verilog IPs source and specifications files.

Moreover, as a SPIRIT based design environment, Magillem V3.0 ensures that all requirements for IP reuse and integration are being taken into account. Creating and manipulating SPIRIT attributes of a design is handled through schematic or scripting interfaces.
Integrating third-party generators becomes easier thanks to the SPIRIT schema; designers have the capability to use their already existing generators associated to their IPs, thus getting a greater flexibility and automation to fit with their current design practices.

As an active participant in the SPIRIT ESL Working Group, defining the SPIRIT TLM specification, Prosilog is currently adapting Magillem and the SPIRIT Packager module to support SPIRIT 2.0 XML specification when it is released.

“ With the latest release of Magillem, our customers have a solid and powerful multi-platform environment which allows them to package, interconnect IPs and generate their design,” says Marcel Saussay CEO of Prosilog.

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Monday, May 23, 2005

Eclipse: Behind the Name

Eclipse: Behind the Name
What's in a name?

Back in 2003, when Sun Microsystems Inc. was considering whether it might join the then soon-to-be-independent Eclipse Foundation, one of the key concerns, aside from technical issues, was the name Eclipse.

Sun said it would not join an organization named Eclipse, and the foundation agreed to change the name. The Santa Clara, Calif., company didn't want to join an organization whose name was perceived as encouraging the demise of Sun, company executives said at the time.

It turned out Sun wasn't the target of the Eclipse moniker, though. In his keynote at the EclipseCon 2005 conference in March, Lee Nackman, chief technology officer and vice president of Design, Construction, and Test Tools at IBM's Rational Software division, said Microsoft Corp. was actually the company IBM wanted to "eclipse" and was the true object of IBM's attention.

"Our target was Microsoft," Nackman said. "Microsoft was clearly the market leader and was on a path to become the dominant tools platform. It was clear there'd be competition for developers… So around 1998 we felt, key to the competition around application servers and middleware, we needed to bring developers to Java-based middleware ... IBM's middleware business depended on bringing developers to our Java-based middleware."

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Thursday, May 19, 2005

IBM plans Eclipse-based Data Integration Toolset

IBM plans Eclipse-based Data Integration Toolset
There’s been a lot of talk about what IBM’s billion-dollar acquisition of data integration specialist Ascential Software Corp. might mean for customers, but little speculation about what’s in store for programmers.

There’s a good chance the combined IBM and Ascential technology stack will be a codejockey-friendly environment.

Eric Sall, program director for information integration with IBM, says Big Blue plans to deliver a converged set of development tools, based on the open-source Eclipse framework, which allow developers to work interchangeably with IBM’s Information Integrator federated data access and Ascential’s own DataStage data integration technologies.

“We have a joint group of architects and engineers planning what we can do. One idea is a converged set of tools, so we could provide a unified Information Integrator user experience, and a common application development tooling framework between [Information Integrator and DataStage],” he explains.

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Eclipse Shines Brighter With Developers

Eclipse Shines Brighter With Developers
The future looks brighter than ever for the Eclipse development platform, according to a recent market research study.

An Evans Data Corporation report released this week shows that Eclipse, the open source Java development environment, continues to gain support among professional developers. In North America, according to the report, the number of developers using Eclipse as their primary IDE grew 90 percent over the past year.

At the same time, according to the report, the number of developers using Eclipse grew more than 70 percent in the Asia Pacific (APAC) region and by more than 60 percent in Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA).

"Among the top three Java IDEs, Eclipse is the only one gaining market share in EMEA, APAC and North America," said Evans analyst Albion Butters in a statement. "Eclipse looks like it may become the true open source killer app," he stated, drawing a comparison with similar growth in the use of MySQL, a popular open source database.

IBM launched Eclipse in 2001, and the project quickly gained widespread support in the Java developer community. Earlier this year, IBM spun off Eclipse as an independent foundation, and the project has attracted support from virtually every major Java tool vendor, with the exception of Sun Microsystems. IBM continues to use Eclipse as the foundation for the company's WebSphere development platform.

Eclipse has also gained a reputation as a highly extensible IDE, creating a market for hundreds of free and commercial developer plug-ins, including a growing number that support other programming languages.

According to the survey, Eclipse is now the most popular Java IDE in North America, although Borland's JBuilder still holds the top spot in the EMEA market.

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Eclipse 3.0's Rich Client Platform

Eclipse 3.0's Rich Client Platform
Taking the drudgery out of cross-platform UI development
By Gene Sally and Maciej Halasz


One of the tremendous engineering feats behind Eclipse is that users don't know they're working with a multiplatform application. The user interface elements (drop-downs, option buttons, hierarchical views, and such) look and operate like other applications on the platform, even though the Eclipse platform is built on the same source code base. This article looks into the technology driving the Eclipse user experience and how you can use it to create your own cross-platform applications.

The Standard Widget Toolkit (SWT) serves as the graphical underpinning for the Eclipse framework, powering a sophisticated IDE. However, the SWT framework isn't only for Eclipse. You can use it by itself or in conjunction with the Rich Client Platform (RCP) when creating multiplatform applications. In this article, I examine the SWT and RCP, and show how to use them to deliver cross-platform applications.


Not Swing
Java graphical user interfaces (GUIs) have long been dominated by Sun's Abstract Widget Toolkit (AWT) and Swing windowing component packages. These two kits are widely used to create Java-compliant graphical components. Both AWT and Swing present a highly abstracted API that shields users from the underlying windowing system. While this thick layer lets AWT and Swing behave more like Java than SWT does, users pay in the form of a suboptimal experience.

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Building an Eclipse Web-Search Plug-In

Building an Eclipse Web-Search Plug-In
A plug-in to search DDJ archives
By Michael Pilone


Text-editor development and command-line compiling have gone the way of the Dodo bird, as today's developers demand more sophisticated tools that provide functionality ranging from extensibility and seamless integration of components, to increased productivity and ease of use. This new generation tool, dubbed an "integrated development environment" (IDE), packages all of these features and more into a single application. In particular, the Eclipse IDE has come to the forefront of IDE technology. Eclipse (http://www.eclipse.org/) provides a stable, highly extensible, and robust plug-in architecture on which an IDE for Java is constructed.

The Eclipse IDE is really a combination of the Eclipse Platform and a number of well-crafted plug-ins. This plug-in architecture lets you add new functionality rapidly as new plug-ins are developed, as well as customization by individual users. In this article, I present an Eclipse plug-in that supports a simple online reference search of the Dr. Dobbs Journal (DDJ) web site. The complete source code and related files are available electronically; see "Resource Center," page 5. [Editor's Note: This plug-in assumes that you have a Premium Subscription to http://www.ddj.com/.]

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Friday, May 13, 2005

Sun updates NetBeans open source tools platform

Sun updates NetBeans open source tools platform
Sun Microsystems on Monday will formally announce an upgrade to the open-source NetBeans development platform and remains undaunted by the rival Eclipse offering.

Available now, the new NetBeans 4.1 Java integrated development environment (IDE) offers improvements in Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) and mobile application support as well as easier development.

"One of the knocks on J2EE is that it's hard. So what we've done with NetBeans is we wanted to make it easy enough for mere humans to program J2EE," and Web services, said Timothy Cramer, director of NetBeans in the Java and Developer Tools Group at Sun, on Wednesday. Wizards and programs are offered for ease of programming.

Also a highlight of NetBeans 4.1 is automated deployment to the BEA Systems WebLogic, IBM WebSphere, and JBoss Java application servers, along with debugging support for these products. Previously, NetBeans only automated deployment to the Sun Java System Application Server.
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NetBeans has been gaining traction among developers, Sun officials said. The platform has had 4.6 million downloads since its inception five years ago, but one-quarter of those downloads have happened in the past six months. Sun qualifies two accesses to the platform as a download, thus eliminating casual, one-time users. NetBeans has 120,000 active users per month, based on a conservative estimate gauging users connected to the NetBeans Internet-based auto-update center.

The numbers presented by Sun for NetBeans seemingly pale in comparison to the 50 million-plus downloads cited by the Eclipse Foundation for its Eclipse open source platform. But Sun officials are skeptical of the Eclipse number and have no plans to either merge NetBeans with Eclipse or to step aside in favor of Eclipse, Sun officials said.

"Not even close," said Sun's James Gosling, a Sun vice president and Sun Fellow, when asked about Sun yielding to Eclipse. Additionally, Sun will not join the Eclipse organization, a move that had been speculated last year.

NetBeans is easier to work with than Eclipse and has been used for building applications ranging from cellphone systems to enterprise and desktop applications, Sun officials said.

The Sun executives also expressed doubts about whether the Eclipse Foundation actually is independent of IBM, which founded Eclipse but spun it off into a separate organization last year. The Eclipse Foundation was asked prior to InfoWorld's meeting with Sun Wednesday to make a general statement of its perspective on NeBeans, but declined.

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Versata Joins Eclipse Foundation; Versata 6 Workbench Based on Eclipse Developer Productivity Tools

Versata Joins Eclipse Foundation; Versata 6 Workbench Based on Eclipse Developer Productivity Tools
Versata, Inc. a leading independent provider of rapid application development platforms to automate and manage complex, data-intensive business systems, today announced that it has joined the Eclipse Foundation. Eclipse is the leading platform for Java development tools and is used as the strategic foundation for developer tools within the Versata product line.

Versata's new business rules engine, Versata 6(TM), which became generally available earlier this month, makes significant use of the Eclipse tools. Versata 6 Workbench(TM) provides a rich metamodel implemented in EMF and eCore that unifies and integrates decision, process, transaction and data rules with an Eclipse development environment. Versata 6 also supports the team development capabilities of Eclipse, including check-in/check-out functionality, integrated source code management and background builds.

Versata 6, working in combination with the JBoss(TM) application server, supports interactive debugging with near real-time dynamic code updates to improve test and debug productivity. Developers can make changes in Versata 6 rules and dynamically run and update debugged code in the application server, providing a fully interactive development environment.

Versata is also contributing to the proposed Eclipse Model Driven Development Integration (MDDi) project within the Eclipse organization. This proposed project is designed to develop a platform that can offer integration capabilities needed to adopt and deploy a Model Driven Development (MDD) approach.

"Early in 2004, we made a major commitment to Eclipse as the core of our new metamodel and development tooling environment, and it has provided tremendous technology and engineering payback to us," said Brett Adam, CTO and vice president of engineering, Versata Inc. "As a result, our customers now benefit from proven, current, feature-rich, development tools that give them the tightly integrated, yet open environment they've been seeking."

"Versata's adoption and support of some of the more advanced modeling features in Eclipse is a great validation of Eclipse and the Eclipse Foundation," said Mike Milinkovich, Executive Director of Eclipse Foundation. "Versata's approach of combining model-driven development with business rules will provide a valuable addition to the suite of solutions running on Eclipse."

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Wednesday, May 11, 2005

An Eclipse worth checking out

An Eclipse worth checking out
THE Eclipse Project is an umbrella open source project aimed at standardising software development tools. The project itself comprises three major subprojects: Eclipse Platform, Java Development Tools (JDT), and Plugin Development Environment.

Last year, Software Development Times, an online publication, gave Eclipse top billing in the Tools and Environments category, and singled out Eclipse in the Influencers category. A survey by market research company Evans Data Corp has indicated that Eclipse use is rapidly rising and that it has pushed the open-source framework to become the most popular integrated development environment (IDE) for Java developers.

Findings from Evans’ last few Linux Development Surveys also show that Eclipse is the No 1 Java development environment in the Linux market. Because of its popularity and open source nature, Eclipse has the edge over other IDEs in this regard – hundreds of plugins, free and commercial, are available.

Some history
The Eclipse Project has its origins in the software originally by Object Technology International (OTI). OTI was aquired by IBM in 1996, which later formed IBM Ottawa Labs. In November 2001, IBM donated the technology to Eclipse.org, an open-source consortium which, then, comprised of industry leaders Borland, IBM, Merant, QNX Software Systems, Rational Software (bought by IBM), Red Hat, SuSE, TogetherSoft (bought over by Borland) and Webgain (now no longer in the Board) as the Board of Stewards.

In February 2004, Eclipse was reorganised into a not-for-profit independent corporation to drive the platform’s evolution for the benefit of providers of software development and its endusers. All the technology and source code within the Eclipse.org ecosystem will remain openly available and royalty-free.

What is Eclipse
The right way to describe Eclipse is that it is a software ecosystem of development tools. Firstly, under it are the Eclipse Project, Eclipse Tools Project and Eclipse Technology Project. Under the aegis of the Eclipse Project are three major subprojects, namely as mentioned earlier: Eclipse Platform, Java Development Tools (JDT), and Plugin Development Environment.

The Platform subproject concerns itself with all the common and core aspects of the tool, rather like the foundation on which other tools can be built upon. Imagine an empty shelf which you can extend, put or hang things on. Or as the FAQ states: The Eclipse Platform is an open extensible IDE for anything and yet nothing in particular.

The JDT subproject develops Java-specific tools like editor, debugger and development environment on top of the base platform. Because Eclipse is not dedicated to Java, JDT is required to create the Java-specific environment. C/C++ and Cobol developing environments are available as well.

The Plugin Development subproject is the development environment for those who develop plugins for Eclipse.

Besides these, there are many other subprojects under the Eclipse Tools category. The visual design tool for interfaces is called the Visual Editor under the Tools Project.

The Eclipse Technology Project is to provide new channels for open source developers, researchers, academics and educators to participate in the on-going evolution of Eclipse.

The standard Eclipse Platform is primed for Java code development. It is a full-fledged Java IDE that offers keyword and syntax colouring, code formatting, code folding, code completion, code templates, Java-aware search, integrated support for refactoring, incremental compilation, and remote debugging. It also supports integration with a task automation tool (Ant), code versioning system (CVS), and JUnit test harness to complete the code and build the development environment.

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Tuesday, May 10, 2005

Eclipse offers adaptable IDEs for Java and C programming work

Eclipse offers adaptable IDEs for Java and C programming work

What is it?
Eclipse is a platform for building integrated development environments (IDEs) for Java and C++ programming, websites and other applications. An open source project begun by IBM, Eclipse is now supported by a wide range of suppliers and organisations, including Borland, Oracle, Computer Associates, Hewlett-Packard and the Object Management Group. In particular, the project wants to involve tool builders to provide plug-in tools for Eclipse IDEs.

The idea of Eclipse is to provide an IDE that can constantly evolve and adapt, instead of being junked with each change in the focus of software development, forcing user organisations to retool, and developers to learn again from scratch. Outside the English-speaking developer community, Eclipse has been enthusiastically adopted in Germany and Japan.

Developers who use Eclipse-based tools have a choice of languages, platforms and suppliers. Eclipse IDEs are used on Linux, HP-UX, IBM AIX, Sun Solaris, Mac OS X and Windows-based systems.

Where did it originate?
The Eclipse Foundation was formed in 2001 by Borland, IBM, Merant, Rational, Red Hat, SuSE and others. It has since been joined by suppliers including Fujitsu, Hitachi, Sybase, SAP, Ericsson, Intel, Micro Focus and JBoss.

In 2004, the foundation was reorganised as a not-for-profit corporation to ensure that the technology and source code would remain openly available and royalty-free.
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Other questions answered. . .
Where did it originate?
What is it for?
What makes it special?
How difficult is it to master?
Where is it used?
What systems does it run on?
What is coming up?


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Systinet Releases Eclipse-Based Web Services Tool

Systinet Releases Eclipse-Based Web Services Tool
Systinet Corp. Monday announced a new development tool for extending the Eclipse application development platform for building Web services.

Systinet Developer 5.5 is a free Eclipse-based download for creating, debugging, compliance testing and deploying Web services, said officials at Burlington, Mass.-based Systinet.

The new version of the tool is a companion product to the Systinet Server for Java 5.5, which is Systinet's run-time environment.

Systinet Developer 5.5 supports the WS-ReliableMessaging specification for ensuring that messages are sent and received reliably. The tool also automatically checks to ensure that Web services comply with the Web Services Interoperability Organization's WS-I Basic Profile, the company said.

In addition, the tool enables developers to publish Web services to a UDDI (Universal Description, Discovery and Integration) Version 3 compliant registry, such as Systinet's own Systinet Registry, the company said.


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Saturday, May 07, 2005

IBM compounds its XML toolset

IBM compounds its XML toolset
A new addition to the Emerging Technologies Toolkit means disparate XML technologies can now be used together
IBM is hoping to push forward adoption of Web technologies like XML, SVG and XForms with an update of its Emerging Technologies Toolkit. The toolkit, based on the open source Eclipse IDE, has been enhanced with a compound document editor, an XML Forms generator and a set of XML tools for Java.

The toolkit is being made available through IBM’s AlphaWorks programme, which often produces leading-edge tools, mostly as a result of research carried out in IBM’s labs. Anthony Kesterton, a Technical Consultant in the Rational division of IBM Software, told Builder UK the company is releasing the toolkit with the aim of spurring on use of XML-related technologies in business applications. "We see things like XML being very important to service-oriented architectures in general. The technology goes out to the developers so they can start building real business systems sooner rather than later."

The compound document editor allows you to create XML documents using a mixture of standards. Some of the languages supported in the editor are XHTML, XForms, XML-Events, SMIL, SVG, VoiceXML, XUL and MathML. While there are editors capable of handling each of these technologies individually, a system that can work with documents formed of several mark-up languages is hard to come by. While use of compound documents is still considered leading-edge technology by many, Kesterton insists that people are ready to use such documents. "I see them being used immediately. These kinds of toolkits get put out because of demand by our customer base. People developing real business applications are looking for this consolidation of XML and other front-end technologies to render them", he commented.
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The toolkit requires Eclipse 3.0, and is available for download from IBM's AlphaWorks site.

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Thursday, May 05, 2005

IBM Adds XML Options To Developers' Toolkit

IBM Adds XML Options To Developers' Toolkit
Compound XML Document Editor helps create and edit Web applications with XML documents that invoke the latest standards.

IBM is adding to its list of XML developers' tools as XML continues "to gain ground as the lingua franca of the Internet," says Marc Goubert, manager of IBM's alphaWorks Web site for developers.

IBM has added several XML pieces to its Emerging Technologies Toolkit found on www.ibm.com/alphaworks. The toolkit is available for free download and contains new tools and technologies that may find their way into future IBM products. Developers make use of what's available in the toolkit with the understanding that it's not a finished IBM product, but alpha or untested versions of tools that IBM is considering for use, Goubert says.

Compound XML Document Editor is one such tool for use in creating and editing Web applications with XML documents that invoke the latest XML standards. The editor can work with Voice XML for adding a voice segment to a document or application interface. The tool also includes support of Synchronized MultiMedia Integration Language, which can manage the number of frames per second at which a video is shown or for other multimedia descriptors.

Additional XML standards supported by Compound XML Document Editor include XForms, a World Wide Web Consortium standard for Web forms that can be used across a wide variety of devices; XPath, the XML query language that can extract specific contents from an XML document; and Scalable Vector Graphics.

A second tool, XForms Generator, helps developers quickly generate XML forms that are tied to business processes.

Both tools may be plugged into the open-source Eclipse developers' workbench, Goubert says.

Another tool that IBM is testing the popularity of through alphaWorks is XML Enhancements for Java. The tool makes it easier to use XML in Java applications by providing specific Java 1.4 language extensions. With the extensions, a developer can build XML-formatted presentations in a Java application while using Java components previously used for other applications.

If XML Enhancements for Java wins broad developer use, Goubert says, IBM or some other party would be likely to propose to the Java Community Process, the organization that controls additions to the language, that it be included in a future version.

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DB Visual Architect 1.0 for Eclipse (Build 20050222) Released

DB Visual Architect 1.0 for Eclipse (Build 20050222) Released
DBVA-EC 1.0 support Object Relational Mapping ( ORM ) and ER Diagram ( ERD ) extensively. The tool helps generating the persistent Java source code you need to access database( s ). It provides multiple database support which allows you to access various DBMS ( MYSQL, Oracle, HSQLDB, MS SQL, Sybase ... ) with the same set of persistent source code. Another feature is the ability to generate database from Class Diagram or ER Diagrams. You can design your application with Class Diagram and ERD within the industry's best visual modeling environment, and generate database table from the resulting diagrams. DBVA-EC also facilitate in the reverse engineering of relational database( s ). You can reverse engineer legacy database system ( DB2, HypersonicSQL, MS SQL, MySQL, Oracle, Pointbase, Sybase, jTDS ... ) to Class Diagram and ERD.

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